Album review: Ronnie Earl/Duke Robillard, The Duke meets the Earl (2005)

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN THE GEORGIA STRAIGHT, APRIL 28, 2005 By Steve Newton Now here's a matchup made in heaven for fans of electric blues guitar. There's some serious jammin' going on in the first-ever studio pairing of the tasty American pickers, both former members of Roomful of Blues. Robillard brings the mastery of technique, while … Continue reading Album review: Ronnie Earl/Duke Robillard, The Duke meets the Earl (2005)

Blues-rock guitar great Lonnie Mack, idol of Stevie Ray Vaughan, dies at 74

By Steve Newton The music world is still in heavy mourning, trying to come to grips with the shocking news of Prince's death today. But the pop legend from Minneapolis wasn't the only gifted artist to pass away on April 21, 2016. Alligator Records sent out a press release tonight relaying the sad news that guitar … Continue reading Blues-rock guitar great Lonnie Mack, idol of Stevie Ray Vaughan, dies at 74

Crossroads 2 (live in the seventies) finds Slowhand bluesy as hell

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN THE GEORGIA STRAIGHT, DEC. 12, 1996 By Steve Newton They should have subtitled this one live (and bluesy) in the seventies, because over the course of this four-CD package old Slowhand really gets down, covering tunes by Johnny Otis, Elmore James, Sonny Boy Williamson, T-Bone Walker, Otis Rush, and—no fewer than six … Continue reading Crossroads 2 (live in the seventies) finds Slowhand bluesy as hell

My one and only interview with legendary bluesman Albert King

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN THE GEORGIA STRAIGHT, AUG. 30, 1990 By Steve Newton The influence of the blues on British supergroups is well documented. The Stones, Zeppelin, Cream—they all lapped up the seminal works of people like Muddy Waters, Willie Dixon, and Howlin’ Wolf. Across the sea in Ireland, a young guitarist named Gary Moore also … Continue reading My one and only interview with legendary bluesman Albert King

The Blasters’ Phil Alvin on the roots of rock ‘n’ roll, racism, and thanking god for the Sex Pistols

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN THE GEORGIA STRAIGHT, MARCH 3, 1983 By Steve Newton On March 10, 1983, the Blasters played the Commodore Ballroom in Vancouver. Maybe you were there? The group--then composed of singer-guitarist Phil Alvin, his younger brother Dave Alvin on lead guitar, pianist Gene Taylor, bassist John Bazz, and drummer Bill Bateman--was in its … Continue reading The Blasters’ Phil Alvin on the roots of rock ‘n’ roll, racism, and thanking god for the Sex Pistols